The Cooling Effect of Trees

Many people live in cities and other highly populated areas. When it gets hot, the heat gets trapped causing what is called a “urban heat island.” Trees and other plants help cool the environment, making vegetation a simple and effective way to reduce urban heat islands.There are an endless amount of benefits to green and open spaces. In urban areas, green spaces help regulate air quality and climate. Trees and vegetation lower surface and air temperatures by providing shade and through evapotranspiration.  Evapotranspiration, alone or in combination with shading, can help reduce peak summer temperatures.

Trees and vegetation are a key component in clean air. Although, we play a large factor as well. Pollutants in the air are terrible.  Trees and vegitation are most useful as a mitigation strategy when planted in strategic locations around buildings or to shade pavement in parking lots on streets. Researchers have found that planting deciduous trees or vines to the west is typically most effective for cooling a building, especially if they shade windows and part of the buildings roof. Trees naturally remove researchers have found that planting decide the heat index for trees is crazy. It is also crazy that trees are the reason our air pollution is so great. I am engaged it is so crazy. Plants and turf are great, but they need watered. It is best

Trees and vegetation are most useful as a mitigation strategy when planted in strategic locations around buildings or to shade pavement in parking lots and on streets. Researchers have found that planting deciduous trees or vines to the west is typically most effective for cooling a building, especially if they shade windows and part of the building’s roof.

Trees naturally remove pollutants from the air, so every tree that’s subtracted from a city’s ecosystem means some pollution remains that should have been filtered out. Plants and turf remove smoke, dust and other pollutants green-spacefrom the air. One tree can remove 26 pounds of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere annually, equaling 11,000 miles of car emissions. One study showed that one acre of trees has the ability to remove 13 tons of particles and gases annually.2,500 square feet of turf absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and releases enough oxygen for a family of four to breathe.

Through the creation of green spaces, natural resources are conserved. By using trees to modify temperatures, the amount of fossil fuels used for cooling and heating is reduced. Some trees can reduce house temperatures in the summer, allowing air conditioning units to run 2 to 4 percent more efficiently (Project Evergreen). The trees also allow the sun to warm the house in the winter.

The increase of plants and mulch in green spaces also holds soil in place. This prevents soil erosion out of lakes, streams, storm drains and roads. In addition, aiding in reducing flooding, mudslides and dust storms. Shading in parking lot mediums and water quality. Enhance storm water words are great lets talk more about words. Words words words, are great.

Trees and vegetation that directly shade buildings decrease demand for air conditioning, in turn reducing energy use. Improved air quality and lower greenhouse gas emissions: By reducing energy demand, trees and vegetation decrease the production of associated air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. They also remove air pollutants and store and sequester carbon dioxide. Enhanced stormwater management and water quality:  Vegetation reduces runoff and improves water quality by absorbing and filtering rainwater. Reduced pavement maintenance: Tree shade can slow deterioration of street pavement, decreasing the amount of maintenance needed. Improved quality of life: Trees and vegetation provide aesthetic value, habitat for many species, and can reduce noise.

Shading in parking lot medians can provide extensive shading coverage.  The primary costs associated with planting and maintaining trees or other vegetation include purchasing materials, initial planting, and ongoing maintenance activities such as pruning, pest and disease control, and irrigation.

A study of urban forestry programs in five U.S. cities showed a range of expenditures: annual costs ranged from almost $15 per tree in the Desert Southwest region to $65 per tree in Berkeley, California. Pruning was often the greatest expenditure, accounting for roughly 25–40% of total annual costs (approximately $4–$20/tree). Administration and inspection costs were the next largest expenditure, ranging from approximately 8–35% of annual expenditures (about $4–$6/tree). Tree planting, surprisingly, accounted for just 2–15% of total annual urban forestry expenditures (roughly $0.50–$4/tree) in these cities.4

Although the benefits of urban forestry can vary considerably by community and tree species, they are almost always higher than the costs. The five-city study discussed above found that, on a per-tree basis, the cities accrued benefits ranging from about $1.50–$3.00 for every dollar invested. These cities spent roughly $15–$65 annually per tree, with net annual benefits ranging from approximately $30–$90 per tree.

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